Pain Sailing

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ATTENTION Owl City fans – sort it out.
Oh, and you’d probably like to know there’s some new material coming out from Adam “Owl City” Young, under a new pseudonym, Sky Sailing.
The idea behind the name change is that An Airplane Carried Me To Bed is more acoustic and traditional than Owl City’s more emopop computerised leanings – but fear not.
Young’s vocal without the swathe of effects is still very much as annoying as before, and the music is a mushy and wet as ever.
In fact, you do well to spot daylight between the two projects output – news which will surely either delight or dismay you.

Richard James is lame

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RATHER than being hot to trot, We Went Riding, the second solo album by Gorky’s Zygotic Mynci co-founder Richard James, is pretty lame.
The LP is mostly made up of folk of the bland, uninspiring variety, occasionally lumped in with some timid rock and a splash of sun-kissed psychedelic pop.
Completely underwhelming, We Went Riding can canter off into the sunset as far as I’m concerned.

Ghost of a chance

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ON THE evidence of War Kids, Faroe Islanders The Ghost will have a battle on their hands growing to be an international act.
Because while the LP may be a lively-spirited affair, the quality is lacking in their sound.
With a lack of punch to their rock akin to lightweights Keane, a pop sensibility without the hooks and an Alphabeat-esque Euro cheese edge courtesy of a cheap keyboard, the cheery feel of a lot of War Kids just doesn’t exorcise The Ghost’s shortcomings.

Too nice Brothers

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PERNICE Brothers, a band led by siblings Joe and Bob, aren’t exactly Liam and Noel Gallagher.
Where most sibling outfits are fuelled by family feuding, The Pernice’s indie rock sound is, well, just too nice.
Their sweet indie pop sound is delicate and carries some clever lyrics along nicely, but even when the group are rocking their very hardest, such as Jacqueline Susann, it’s all just a bit wet.
Someone needs to come along and steal their lunch money or something.

Literally Music For The Fire

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EVER been searching for something on the web, thought you’d found it and then clicked onto a website that’s just a massive list of words desperately trying to get some sort of attention from search engines?
Listening to Music For The Fire by eclectic collaborative project People Like Us & Wobbly is the musical equivalent of those pointless wastes of webspace.
Sure some of this pointless mish mash of samples, such as Giant Love Ball, is diverting – infinite monkey syndrome I suppose – but for the most part this is gibberish.
At least they had the self-awareness to name it Music For The Fire – that may well be where my promo CD’s heading.

Goodbye Darlin’

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TRANSCONTINENTAL troubadours Allo’ Darlin’ make an introduction with a self-titled album that’s too cute for it’s own good.
Allo’ Darlin’ is sunny sounding – not surprising then that half the band is Australian, with the rest UK-based.
And don’t get me wrong, there’s some nice moments here – such as the Weezer-referencing on Kiss Your Lips – and sure, it’s great to be happy.
But Christ, where’s the British half of the band’s moaning to counter-balance it all.

Ono not again

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DANISH band Oh No Ono’s disappointing last album Eggs was a no go for me – so I approached Internet Warrior with reservations.
The main problem with Eggs was the density of the sound – and some of this mess has been cleared away in every remix by the likes of Caribou and Zambri, making it easier to connect to individual tracks.
But as a collection, there’s no flow, with chillout and heavy bass jarring from track to track.
So although the lead track to the EP is one of the better cuts from the album, and in most cases the remixes here are improvements on the originals, I’m not likely to navigate back to Internet Warrior any time soon.

We Are The World a global disaster

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DESPITE sharing a name with a massive 1980s benefit single, We Are The World didn’t leave me feeling very charitable.
The LA group’s LP Clay Stones instrumentally is worthy – with consistency demonstrated over 10 sturdy, stomping dance tracks laced with pulsating electronica-rock-hip hop not dissimilar to an Americanised These New Puritans.
If they’d kept it instrumental, I’d be swayed by the likes of Goya Monster and Lord Have Ass.
But vocally the group are plain irritating, so it’s all ruined for me.
There’s a love of vocal effects which is a bit grating, but the main problem is the lead is provided by a vocalist who sounds like someone doing a really bad impression of Kelis – and I hate it so much right now.

Soft Thorn

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HAVING to listen to Love And Its Opposite was a Tracey Thorn in my side.
Because the Everything But The Girl vocalist’s album had everything but the electronica which suits her so well.
Instead, with more trad singer songwriter backing, and only hints of her previously computer-dominated body of work, I found this collection pretty underwhelming.
In fact, a lot of it wouldn’t sound out of place on a Beautiful South b-sides collection.
Love And Its Opposite – guess which one I’m leaning towards…

Kevin Costner’s Turn It On a turn-off

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WATERWORLD we live in, where Hollywood A-listers can just fandango into the recording studio and put together an album willy nilly, whereas the likes of me continue to languish in obscurity.
But enough of my struggle.
Some of these stars, musically, are untouchables – Juliette Lewis’s Juliette And The Licks, Jared Leto’s 30 Seconds To Mars – but others, like Kevin Costner And Modern West, see the actors merely chasing dreams.
Turn It On, the group’s second, sees them turn out derivative Bruce Springsteen-style country-tinged rock and roll – pub rock if you will.
And while the group play it to the bone, the material just doesn’t make the cut.