Download: Pump some of Wildlife’s …On The Heart onto your computer

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I LOVE to see a band in love with their own work, swelling with pride.
And it’s clearly the case with Wildlife‘s latest release, their …On The Heart album, which sounds like a heady mix of Arcade Fire and The Killers.
They said: “…On The Heart is a record about the engine that drives us and carries us along that road.
“It is a love letter, an essay on the heart – everything it does for us, to us, how it hurts us, helps and keeps us going.
“We put our hearts into making this thing, completely, with all the violence and romance we could muster.”
Taste a bit of this labour of love with this free dowload of single Born To Ruin – Wildlife – Born To Ruin

Review: Fat White Family’s Champagne Holocaust lacking fizz

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FAT White Family’s image is a wild one – one of them’s even naked in the promo picture they sent through, and you can see his fat white family member and everything.
And the sound on debut LP Champagne Holocaust did leave me pleasantly surprised – a mixture of The Libertines’ ramshackle rock and the knowing cool of the Velvet Underground, with a light sprinkling of Americana to season.
But although I was pleasantly surprised by their sound, there’s still a niggling doubt that the word “pleasant” shouldn’t be one to spring to mind with a band like this.
Hopefully the hype surrounding their live shows can add a bit of fizz to future recordings that may just be lacking on Champagne Holocaust.
3/5

From the archives: Kvelertak on track

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IT IS generally thought that the British Midlands is the spiritual home of heavy metal – but bands like Kvelertak prove it probably holidays in Scandinavia.
I checked out the self-titled album by Norwegians Kvelertak on the strength of the cover art, and as the last time I did that I discovered the amazing Six Gallery’s Breakthroughs In Modern Art I should probably chance it a bit more.
Because Kvelertak is simply amazing – led by chugging guitars and Norwegian vocals, the LP is undoubtedly very metal.
However their sound encompasses all manner of influences, from Mastodon-like prog metal to Backyard Babies-style glam to throat-shredding Gallows punk, and they’re not afraid to break out the acoustic guitars when needed.
5/5

Review: Bonobo’s The North Borders bordering on brilliance

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I’VE only had access to Bonobo’s latest album The North Borders for a short time, but I already love it so much I’m not going to resort to cheap chimp jokes in this review.
And that, dear readers, is a lot of love.
Because Bonobo has done what he does best here, creating an hypnotic fractal soundscape that works on level after level.
First and foremost its’s simply an enjoyable listen – while there are Burial-type dubstep beats on Emkay, or deep, mantra-like techno influences on Cirrus, nothing stops the joyous, orchestra-soaked vibe shining through.
And as well, the vocals added by the likes of Grey Reverend and Erykah Badu have clearly been cherry-picked and used almost as another instrument in his mix.
At times in the past this ‘mass appeal’ feeling to his work has meant that the true genius of what Bonobo does can be missed – he doesn’t push his creativity in your face, the way the likes of Four Tet or Autechre or many more of his peers do.
But delve deeper, and there’s reward enough for the intense listener, miniscule tweaks of the horns, or gradual building of layers, Bobono never lets a track lie, as The North Borders ebbs and flows throughout.
Quite simply, if you don’t agree that this mesmeric collection isn’t the best dance album of 2013, I don’t give a monkeys.
5/5

Review: Los Chinches clinch my attention

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FED up with the same old run of the mill repeated rubbish pumping out of the radio?
I bloody am.
So I was particularly pleased to have a copy of Los Chinches’ Fongo land on my desk.
The group are a London-based outfit, a mixture of European and Latin American musicians who mix cumbia grooves with retro psychedelic-tinged Peruvia ‘chicha’ rock and ska – stick that up your “great music variety”, radio.
And the upbeat retro sound of Fongo harnesses the sunny South American disposition, and the hot rhythms of the continent, to create a good time sound that is at times a bit corny, but always entertaining and most definitely not run of the mill.
3/5